Le clans des mouettes

ainsi est la force.
 
AccueilAccueil  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 The TranslationalResearch Institute for Space Health (TRISH)

Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 9195
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr/
Date d'inscription : 09/11/2005

MessageSujet: The TranslationalResearch Institute for Space Health (TRISH)   Ven 9 Fév à 4:06

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH)
The Translational Research Institute (TRI) for Space Health
The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH)
Credits: TRISH

NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) partners with external entities in researching and developing innovative approaches to reduce risks to humans on long-duration exploration missions, including NASA’s Journey to Mars. One of these partnerships is the The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) , a cooperative agreement with a consortium led by Baylor College of Medicine and includes the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. The mission of the TRISH is to lead a national effort in translating cutting edge emerging terrestrial biomedical research and technology development into applied space flight human risk mitigation strategies for human exploration missions.

Translational research is an interdisciplinary model of research that focuses on translating fundamental research concepts into practice, with appreciable health outcomes. The TRISH will implement a “bench-to-spaceflight” model, moving results or methods from laboratory experiments or clinical trials to point-of-care astronaut health and performance applications. The goal of the research is to produce promising new approaches, treatments, countermeasures or technologies that have practical application to spaceflight.

The TRISH’s primary objectives are:
Work cooperatively with the NASA Human Research Program to develop and manage the implementation of a relevant research and technology portfolio of single- and multi-disciplinary teams that will lead to the identification and translation to NASA of novel knowledge and methodologies (across all biomedical, human performance and associated technological disciplines) directly applicable to human health and performance risk reduction strategies for long-duration human exploration of space and planetary bodies

Promote and provide the means for active collaboration with academic, not-for profit, for-profit, government, military and international entities to create innovative solutions to reducing spaceflight-associated human health and performance risks

Provide training and development opportunities for scientists, postdoctoral fellows or physicians looking to apply their expertise to solving NASA issues

Implement a "best value" research program for the available resources, insuring minimal investment in overhead, while maximizing investments in research, collaborations, and technology maturation

To learn more about TRISH please visit:  https://www.bcm.edu/centers/space-medicine/translational-research-institute.

https://www.nasa.gov/hrp/tri

National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Page Last Updated: Jan. 30, 2018.
Page Editor: Timothy Gushanas.
NASA Official: Brian Dunbar.

Find Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Clinical Trials
Search for clinical trials and studies related to Alzheimer's,
other dementias, mild cognitive impairment, and caregiving.

https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/clinical-trials

Common Questions About Participating in Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Research
How Can I Find Out About Alzheimer’s Trials and Studies?
Check the resources below:

Ask your doctor, who may know about local research studies that may be right for you.
Sign up for a registry or a matching service to be invited to participate in studies or trials when they are available in your area.
Contact Alzheimer’s research centers or memory or neurology clinics in your community. They may be conducting trials.
Visit the Alzheimer’s and related Dementias Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center clinical trials finder.
Look for announcements in newspapers and other media.
Search www.clinicaltrials.gov.
Why Would I Participate in a Clinical Trial?
There are many reasons why you might choose to join an Alzheimer’s or dementia clinical trial. You may want to:

Help others, including future family members, who may be at risk for Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia
Receive regular monitoring by medical professionals
Learn about Alzheimer’s and your health
Test new treatments that might work better than those currently available
Get information about support groups and resources
What Else Should I Consider?
Consider both benefits and risks when deciding whether to volunteer for a clinical trial.

While there are benefits to participating in a clinical trial or study, there are some risks and other issues to consider as well.

Risk. Researchers make every effort to ensure participants’ safety. But, all clinical trials have some risk. Before joining a clinical trial, the research team will explain what you can expect, including possible side effects or other risks. That way, you can make an informed decision about joining the trial.

Expectations and motivations. Single clinical trials and studies generally do not have miraculous results, and participants may not benefit directly. With a complex disease like Alzheimer’s, it is unlikely that one drug will cure or prevent the disease.

Uncertainty. Some people are concerned that they are not permitted to know whether they are getting the experimental treatment or a placebo (inactive treatment), or may not know the results right away. Open communication with study staff can help you understand why the study is set up this way and what you can expect.

Time commitment and location. Clinical trials and studies last days to years. They usually require multiple visits to study sites, such as private research facilities, teaching hospitals, Alzheimer’s research centers, or doctors’ offices. Some studies pay participants a fee and/or reimburse travel expenses.

Study partner requirement. Many Alzheimer’s trials require a caregiver or family member who has regular contact with the person to accompany the participant to study appointments. This study partner can give insight into changes in the person over time.

What Happens When a Person Joins a Clinical Trial or Study?
Once you identify a trial or study you are interested in, contact the study site or coordinator. You can usually find this contact information in the description of the study, or you can contact the ADEAR Center. Study staff will ask a few questions on the phone to determine if you meet basic qualifications for the study. If so, they will invite you to come to the study site. If you do not meet the criteria for the study, don’t give up! You may qualify for a future study.

What Is Informed Consent?
It is important to learn as much as possible about a study or trial to help you decide if you would like to participate. Staff members at the research center can explain the study in detail, describe possible risks and benefits, and clarify your rights as a participant. You and your family should ask questions and gather information until you understand it fully.

After the research is explained and you decide to participate, you will be asked to sign an informed consent form, which states that you understand and agree to participate. This document is not a contract. You are free to withdraw from the study at any time if you change your mind or your health status changes.

Researchers must consider whether the person with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia is able to understand and consent to participate in research. If the person cannot provide informed consent because of problems with memory and thinking, an authorized legal representative, or proxy (usually a family member), may give permission for the person to participate, particularly if the person’s durable power of attorney gives the proxy that authority. If possible, the person with Alzheimer’s should also agree to participate.

How Do Researchers Decide Who Will Participate?
Researchers carefully screen all volunteers to make sure they meet a study's criteria.

After you consent, you will be screened by clinical staff to see if you meet the criteria to participate in the trial or if anything would exclude you. The screening may involve cognitive and physical tests.

Inclusion criteria for a trial might include age, stage of dementia, gender, genetic profile, family history, and whether or not you have a study partner who can accompany you to future visits. Exclusion criteria might include factors such as specific health conditions or medications that could interfere with the treatment being tested.

Many volunteers must be screened to find enough people for a study. Generally, you can participate in only one trial or study at a time. Different trials have different criteria, so being excluded from one trial does not necessarily mean exclusion from another.

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/common-questions-about-participating-alzheimers-and-related-dementias-research

AINSI,

June 3, 2016
Microbes in Space: JPL Researcher Explores Tiny Life
Kasthuri "Venkat" Venkateswaran, center,  Ryan Hendrickson, left, and intern Courtney Carlson, right.
Kasthuri "Venkat" Venkateswaran, senior research scientist at JPL, center, works with engineer Ryan Hendrickson, left, and intern Courtney Carlson, right.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Samples of fungi and bacteria
The Microbial Tracking-1 experiment has collected samples of fungi and bacteria from the International Space Station. This fungi sample was collected on May 5 and 6, 2016.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Petri dish containing colonies of fungi
This photo shows a petri dish containing colonies of fungi from the Microbial Tracking-1 experiment. The sample was collected on the International Space Station on May 15, 2015.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech
SpaceX Dragon capsule nears the International Space Station
A SpaceX Dragon capsule nears the International Space Station during the CRS-8 mission to deliver experiments including two microbial investigations.
Credits: NASA
On May 11, a sealed capsule containing fungi and bacteria fell from the sky and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean. Microbiologist Kasthuri Venkateswaran could hardly wait to see what was inside it.

At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, Venkateswaran, who goes by Venkat, studies microbial life -- the wild world of organisms too small for us to see with our eyes. Among his many research endeavors, Venkat has leading roles on two microbial experiments that recently returned from the International Space Station. The bacteria and fungi that came back last month will help researchers study how microgravity affects tiny organisms that were deliberately brought from Earth, and what kinds of microbes were already living alongside astronauts.

Venkat's curiosity has taken his research from the depths of the ocean to the space station and beyond. His fascination with the survival of life in extreme environments has led to a variety of research endeavors. At JPL, he has become a leading expert in identifying microbes and preventing them from catching a ride on spacecraft. All the while, he has discovered and named 25 new organisms, including 15 since joining JPL.

"I like naming new things," Venkat said recently in his office on top of a hill at JPL, near the Mars rover testing area. "All these 39 years of my research, one underlying theme is the rapid detection of microbes -- and some of these had never been detected before."

Early Days of Studying Microbes

In the late 1970s, when Venkat was in graduate school, microbiology had not yet benefited from advances in technology that have since revolutionized the field. But the world of tiny organisms was fascinating to Venkat, who thought he wanted to study deep-sea microbes. For his first of two Ph.D.s, Venkat studied how microbes help recycle nutrients in seawater at Annamalai University in his native country of India. This led to a five-year stint inspecting the quality of seafood exported from India to other countries.

Venkat then became interested in food microbiology. He received a second Ph.D. from Hiroshima University in Japan in 1990, and worked in the food processing industry in Japan. Venkat's expertise came in handy for finding E. coli bacteria causing foodborne illnesses. Venkat's molecular detection methods were able to process 10,000 samples in a week.

"I was fortunate enough to see my science implemented right away," Venkat said. "This gave me great personal satisfaction."

Venkat then migrated to a different area entirely: oil. A Japanese company hired him to help with the cleanup of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The spill occurred in Prince William Sound, Alaska, in 1989, but its effects lasted for years. Venkat and colleagues figured out which marine bacteria to introduce into the ecosystem -- a variety that would be harmless to fish but would eat up the oil.

From the Ocean to Space

A big turning point in Venkat's career was in 1996, when he accepted an invitation to come to the United States to become a senior researcher at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. In January 1998, his advisor moved the laboratory to JPL, and the staff moved with him. It was then that the microbiologist adopted the nickname Venkat, and turned his attention to the idea of life on other planets.

What kinds of earthly microbes can survive in space? This question has been a driver of Venkat's research at JPL. Planetary protection -- ensuring that NASA spacecraft do not contaminate other worlds -- is important for planning missions to study Mars and beyond.

Spacecraft are built in "clean rooms," which, as the name suggests, are supposed to be free of particles such as dust. These particles can carry bacteria, which has implications for spacecraft built to look for life on other planets -- otherwise, if an instrument detects bacteria, we won't know if it came from Earth or elsewhere. But because people build spacecraft, and people carry invisible bugs in their bodies, being able to detect and control for bacteria is essential in a clean room situation.

"Planetary protection required the skills that I have for developing a rapid microbial technology system, so that you can measure the microbial contamination associated with a spacecraft," Venkat said.

When Venkat began working at JPL, it took three days to determine the cleanliness of a spacecraft before it was authorized to fly, which was a relatively long time to wait for an analysis of bacteria. Venkat's team worked on methods to hasten the process. Now, within 30 minutes they can determine how many microbes of certain kinds were present, and within eight hours, they can differentiate between dead and live bacteria.

Venkat's group has also detected radiation-resistant bacteria that had never been seen before. His track record includes doing planetary protection advising for NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, and the European Space Agency's Mars Express lander.

Studying Life on the Space Station

Venkat also studies the health of astronauts in space. This is an especially important issue for long-duration flights, such as trips to Mars. The combination of microgravity and radiation can diminish the effectiveness of the immune system and make innocuous microorganisms potentially harmful -- "double points," as Venkat puts it.

The Microbial Tracking-1 experiment, for which Venkat is the principal investigator, is an ongoing effort to study what kinds of microbes are on the space station, both in the environment and in the astronauts' bodies. An October 2015 study in the journal Microbiome found Corynebacterium, which may cause respiratory infection, and Propionibacterium, which may cause acne, in samples that came from an air filter and a vacuum bag from the space station.

The most recent payload is the third installment of the Microbial Tracking-1 project. Having done surveys of the kinds of microbes present on the station, Venkat's group will next study how harmful those microbes could be.

But some microbes are beneficial to human health. In a different experiment recently on the space station called Micro-10, Venkat and colleagues sent fungi to the space station to see if they produce novel compounds that could be used for medical purposes. There is some evidence that because of the stress of microgravity, fungi could give rise to new substances that could have applications for cancer treatment. Both Microbial Tracking-1 and Micro-10 were payloads managed by NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, on the recent SpaceX-8 flight to the space station on April 8, 2016.

The work doesn't end there. On the next SpaceX flight to the station, planned for July, Venkat's group is sending eight different fungi. These fungi are special because they were isolated from the area near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the site of a devastating accident in Ukraine in 1986. These unique fungi popped up after the accident and grew toward the radiation source.

"We are sending these fungi to the space station to see if they produce new compounds that could be used as radiation therapy molecules," Venkat said.

Teaching the Next Generation

Besides investigating bacteria, Venkat enjoys advising and collaborating with young researchers.

"The biggest assets for my career, to be where I am right now, are my students and postdocs," he said.

He has had more than 20 postdoctoral scholars, 75 college summer students and around 20 graduate students working with him over the course of his career at JPL.

"Dr. Venkat showed me and other members of our group that teamwork and collaboration are very crucial while doing research," said Aleksandra Checinska, a postdoctoral scholar at JPL through Caltech in Pasadena, which manages JPL for NASA. "As a young scholar at the beginning of my career, I am privileged to work with a scientist who is open-minded to new ideas and has an unquenchable passion for his work."

Fun Questions for JPL's Kasthuri Venkateswaran:

What is your favorite moment ever in a laboratory?

When I found my first new bug: a Salmonella novel species. Bacteria that cause disease, such as salmonella, are most interesting to me.

If you could go back in time and meet your 17-year-old self, what would you tell him?

You are too busy and might miss some of the teenage fun. So, enjoy the moment.

How do you explain your job to someone at a cocktail party who is not a scientist?

Looking for life on other planets…and then finding out how microbial contamination of spacecraft will compromise the science.

Elizabeth Landau
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA
818-354-6425
elizabeth.landau@jpl.nasa.gov

2016-141

Last Updated: Aug. 7, 2017
Editor: Tony Greicius
Tags:  Astrobiology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Living in Space, Technology, Universe

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/microbes-in-space-jpl-researcher-explores-tiny-life

La Terre est une bulle, la relativité des mots et la prégnance des faits.

RAPPORT DE
Y'BECCA
ET DU
CITOYEN TIGNARD YANIS
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 9195
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr/
Date d'inscription : 09/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: The TranslationalResearch Institute for Space Health (TRISH)   Ven 9 Fév à 4:09

Aug. 29, 2016
First DNA Sequencing in Space a Game Changer
NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins
NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins sequenced DNA in space for the first time ever for the Biomolecule Sequencer investigation, using the MinION sequencing device.
Credits: NASA
NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) crew member, Matthias Maurer of ESA
NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) crew member, Matthias Maurer of ESA, works on inserting samples into the MinION DNA sequencer as part of the Biomolecule Sequencer experiment. Researchers tested the device aboard the analog to minimize unknowns and see how the device worked in various extreme environments.
Credits: NASA
The light, portable, diminutive biomolecule sequencer fits in the palm of your hand
The MinION™ DNA sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies fits in the palm of a hand.
Credits: Oxford Nanopore Technologies
For the first time ever, DNA was successfully sequenced in microgravity as part of the Biomolecule Sequencer experiment performed by NASA astronaut Kate Rubins this weekend aboard the International Space Station. The ability to sequence the DNA of living organisms in space opens a whole new world of scientific and medical possibilities. Scientists consider it a game changer.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, contains the instructions each cell in an organism on Earth needs to live. These instructions are represented by the letters A, G, C and T, which stand for the four chemical bases of DNA, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine. Both the number and arrangement of these bases differ among organisms, so their order, or sequence, can be used to identify a specific organism.

The Biomolecule Sequencer investigation moved us closer to this ability to sequence DNA in space by demonstrating, for the first time, that DNA sequencing is possible in an orbiting spacecraft.

With a way to sequence DNA in space, astronauts could diagnose an illness, or identify microbes growing in the International Space Station and determine whether or not they represent a health threat. A space-based DNA sequencer would be an important tool to help protect astronaut health during long duration missions on the journey to Mars, and future explorers could also potentially use the technology to identify DNA-based life forms beyond Earth.

The Biomolecule Sequencer investigation sent samples of mouse, virus and bacteria DNA to the space station to test a commercially available DNA sequencing device called MinION, developed by Oxford Nanopore Technologies. The MinION works by sending a positive current through pores embedded in membranes inside the device, called nanopores. At the same time, fluid containing a DNA sample passes through the device. Individual DNA molecules partially block the nanopores and change the current in a way that is unique to that particular DNA sequence. By looking at these changes, researchers can identify the specific DNA sequence.

Rubins, who has a background in molecular biology, conducted the test aboard the station while researchers simultaneously sequenced identical samples on the ground. The tests were set up to attempt to make spaceflight conditions, primarily microgravity, the only variables that could account for differences in results. For example, the samples were prepared on the ground for sequencing and researchers selected organisms whose DNA has already been completely sequenced so that they knew what results to expect.

Using the device in the microgravity environment introduces several potential challenges, according to Aaron Burton, NASA planetary scientist and principal investigator, including the formation of air bubbles in the fluid. On Earth, bubbles rise to the top of a liquid solution and can be removed by centrifuge, but in space, bubbles are less predictable.

“In space, if an air bubble is introduced, we don’t know how it will behave,” said Burton. “Our biggest concern is that it could block the nanopores.”

The technology demonstration also seeks to validate that the device is durable enough to withstand vibration during launch and can operate reliably in a microgravity environment when it comes to the measurement of changes in current or the conversion of those changes into DNA sequences. In addition, researchers will be looking for any other factors that could produce errors or impact performance on orbit.

“Those are just the potential problems we’ve identified,” said project manager and NASA microbiologist Sarah Castro-Wallace. “A lot of the things that might introduce errors are simply unknown at this point.”

To minimize those unknowns, researchers recently tested the entire sequencing process on a NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation, or NEEMO, in the Aquarius Base research facility 60 feet underwater off the coast of Florida.

“The NEEMO tests went smoothly,” Castro-Wallace said. “In terms of a harsh environment, with different humidity, temperature and pressure, we looked at a lot of variables and the sequencer performed as expected.”

NEEMO aquanauts collected environmental samples from the habitat, extracted and prepared the DNA for sequencing, and finally sequenced the DNA as part of a continuation of the Biomolecule Sequencer investigation. Testing this sample-to-sequencer process in an extreme environment is an important step towards its use on the ISS.

The investigation team includes others at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Goddard Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center, as well as partners at Weill Cornell Medical College and University of California at San Francisco.

As the researchers compare results from the sequences collected in microgravity and on Earth, so far everything seems to match up.

“A next step is to test the entire process in space, including sample preparation as well as performing the sequencing,” said Castro-Wallace. Then astronauts can move beyond creating a known DNA sequence and actually extract, prepare and sequence DNA to identify unknown microbes on orbit.

“Onboard sequencing makes it possible for the crew to know what is in their environment at any time,” Castro-Wallace said. “That allows us on the ground to take appropriate action – do we need to clean this up right away, or will taking antibiotics help or not? We can resupply the station with disinfectants and antibiotics now, but once crews move beyond the station’s low Earth orbit, we need to know when to save those precious resources and when to use them.”

In addition, the sequencer can become a tool for other science investigations aboard the station. For example, researchers could use it to examine changes in genetic material or gene expression on orbit rather than waiting for the samples to return to Earth for testing.

"Welcome to systems biology in space,” said Rubins after the first few DNA molecules had been sequenced successfully. She went on to thank the ground team for their efforts. “It is very exciting to be with you guys together at the dawn of genomics biology and systems biology in space."

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/dna_sequencing

DEMENTIA RESEARCH AND CLINICAL TRIALSCLINICAL TRIALS
Registries and Matching Services
Can’t find a trial that fits you? Consider joining a registry or matching service to help advance research on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

All studies have rules (inclusion and exclusion criteria like age, other health conditions, medications, and location) that limit who can participate. Studies might not be available in the right place at the right time for you. However, you can make yourself available to many local and national studies by joining a registry or matching service.

Registries help speed up trials by giving researchers a list of “willing and able” potential participants. People who sign up may be referred to specific studies but are not obligated to participate. Some studies may be simple, like a survey, and can be done anywhere.

The following registries accept adult participants with a variety of backgrounds.

Alzheimer’s Prevention Registry
Open to individuals age 18 and older who are interested in learning about and possibly participating in Alzheimer’s prevention clinical studies and trials.

Brain Health Registry
Open to individuals age 18 and older who want to promote healthy brain function by preventing brain diseases, disorders, and injuries. Take online tests, learn about opportunities to participate in a wide range of studies.

FTD Disorders Registry
A contact and research registry for people diagnosed with frontotemporal disorders (FTD); open to family members, caregivers, or friends of people diagnosed with FTD disorders.

GeneMatch
Open to adults age 55 to 75 who are interested in enrolling in Alzheimer’s genetics studies.

ResearchMatch
A service, funded by the National Institutes of Health, that helps match people of all ages interested in clinical trials with researchers. Requires an email address.

TrialMatch
The Alzheimer’s Association’s clinical studies matching service for individuals with Alzheimer’s, caregivers, and healthy volunteers.

For further assistance with finding opportunities to participate in research, contact the NIA ADEAR Center at 1-800-438-4380.

Content reviewed: July 07, 2017

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/registries-and-matching-services

Paroles de la chanson Bambino par Dalida
Les yeux battus,
La mine triste et les joues blêmes,
Tu ne dors plus,
Tu n'es que l'ombre de toi même,
Seul dans la rue
Tu rôdes comme une âme en peine
Et tous les soirs
Sous sa fenêtre on peut te voir
Je sais bien que tu l'adores
Et qu'elle a de jolis yeux,
Mais tu es trop jeune encor
Pour jouer les amoureux !
Et gratta gratta sul tuo mandolino
Mon petit Bambino,
Ta musiqu' est plus jolie que tout le ciel de l'Italie,
Et chante, chante de ta voix câline
Mon petit Bambino,
Tu peux chanter tant que tu veux
Ell' ne te prends pas au sérieux
Avec tes cheveux si blonds

Tu as l'air d'un chérubin, va plutôt jouer au ballon
Comme font tous les gamins !

Tu peux fumer comme un monsieur des cigarettes,
Te déhancher sur le trottoir quand tu la guettes,
Tu peux pencher sur ton oreille ta casquette,
Ce n'est pas ça qui dans son coeur te vieillira.
L'amour et la jalousie ne sont pas des jeux d'enfant
Et tu as toute la vie pour souffrir comme les grands !
Et gratta gratta sul tuo mandolino
Mon petit Bambino,
Ta musiqu' est plus jolie que tout le ciel de l'Italie,
Et chante chante de ta voix câline
Mon petit Bambino,
Tu peux chanter tant que tu veux
Ell' ne te prends pas au sérieux si tu as trop de tourment
Ne le garde pas pour toi
Va le dire à ta maman,
Les mamans c'est fait pour ça...
Et là, blotti dans l'ombre douce de ses bras,
Pleure un bon coup et ton chagrin s'envolera.

Les larmes sont constituées de liquide lacrymal qui déborde de l'œil. Elles sont salées, secrétées par les glandes lacrymales au niveau des yeux.

Elles se présentent sous forme de gouttes qui coulent le long des joues : le verbe qui désigne la production de larmes est pleurer (ou parfois larmoyer).

Une production (réflexe) accrue de larmes est activée par certains stimuli, par exemple si le système nerveux détecte un danger au niveau de la cornée tel qu'un contact avec un objet ou un acide (ex : le 1-sulfinylpropane qui attaque l'œil quand on épluche un oignon ; dans ce cas larmoyer permet de diluer la molécule et de la chasser de la paroi oculaire).

Les larmes trahissent le plus souvent un état de désespoir, de tristesse ou de douleur, mais peuvent aussi apparaître en d'autres circonstances émotionnelles : joie, rire, rage… Pleurer est normalement un acte réflexe, mais certains comédiens peuvent produire des larmes en évoquant intérieurement des circonstances provoquant la tristesse.

Dans diverses cultures, des pleureuses étaient ou sont encore appelées pour pleurer les morts.

Composition et fabrication[modifier | modifier le code]
Article détaillé : liquide lacrymal.
Le liquide produit et sécrété lors du larmoiement est essentiellement aqueux, contenant entre autres du chlorure de sodium (qui donne aux larmes leur goût salé) ainsi que d'autres ions, des lipides, des enzymes et, accessoirement, certains médicaments2. D'après une étude menée en 1981, sa composition varie et les larmes versées lors d'une émotion sont plus riches en protéines que celles versées pour une simple irritation locale3. Cette étude n'aurait cependant pas amené de preuve scientifique4.

Le Studio Weave et les experts de la récolte de larmes Halen Môn fabriquent plusieurs types de sel à partir de celui contenu dans les larmes, en les distinguant selon l'origine de celles-ci et l'émotion qui les a causées. Une seule boutique, située à Londres, les proposait à la vente en 20125.

Rôles[modifier | modifier le code]
Le liquide lacrymal permet l'oxygénation et la protection de la cornée.

Les larmes permettent un soulagement des tensions psychiques. Pleurer est souvent un acte réflexe qui soulage les tensions psychiques fortes, telles : anxiété, angoisse, peur, tristesse, ou tout autre trop-plein de tension même positive (« pleurer » de joie). Les larmes ont donc aussi un rôle protecteur psychique. Elles sont un des moyens de communication non verbale dont dispose l'Homme, notamment quand il est bébé, enfant ou personne âgée ou qu'il n'est pas en état de parler.

Les larmes d'émotion d'un individu pourraient ainsi contenir un signal chimique volatil dont la perception par un autre individu, par le biais des récepteurs de l'olfaction, serait à l'origine d'un effet sur son état d'esprit (diminution de la tension sexuelle, de la testostérone chez l'homme…)6.

Facteurs non émotionnels agissant sur la production de larmes[modifier | modifier le code]

Larme glissant dans la « vallée des larmes » (sillon entre les joues et la partie haute du nez).
Effet du vieillissement[modifier | modifier le code]
Après l'âge de 45 ans, comme toute glande, le système lacrymal se dégrade, ce qui diminue la quantité de larmes produite, surtout chez la femme.

Il existe de plus des effets du temps qui aboutissent à des dysfonctionnements de la pompe lacrymale ayant pour effets :

une augmentation de la laxité palpébrale horizontale et la descente du muscle des paupières ;
une éversion des méats lacrymaux ;
une malposition palpébrale.
Ces effets entraînent un défaut d'évacuation des larmes par le conduit lacrymo-nasal et un larmoiement chronique.

La production de larmes est nécessairement influencée par l'environnement de l'individu. Le rôle protecteur doit s'adapter aux conditions de l’œil pour empêcher sa sécheresse sans le noyer mais aussi réagir contre les poussières en les évacuant tout comme les microbes.

Facteurs environnementaux[modifier | modifier le code]
Ces facteurs environnementaux sont nombreux et tous les traiter serait impossible. On dira alors que le système lacrymal est intelligent et change la quantité de larmes sécrétées en fonction de l'environnement dans les quantités idéales pour chaque cas.

En effet, lorsque le climat est chaud et sec, l’œil se dessèche plus vite du fait de l'évaporation. Dans ce cas la production augmente et les paupières clignent plus régulièrement afin de répartir ce surplus.

Lorsque le temps est humide, la production est moindre car l'évaporation est elle aussi faible. Dans un même temps, les paupières battent moins vite.

Lorsque l'on traverse une zone poussiéreuse, il faut évacuer ces envahisseurs qui peuvent endommager l’œil. La quantité de larmes est donc augmentée et une grande partie des poussières sont transférées par l'intermédiaire de larmes dans le nez où elles forment des blocs compacts.

Un exemple précis : l'oignon[modifier | modifier le code]
Dans le cytoplasme des cellules d’oignon se trouve un composé appelé alliine (acide aminé sulfoxydé) ; la vacuole, elle, contient une enzyme appelée alliinase. Quand la lame du couteau coupe la rondelle d’oignon et déchire la membrane cellulaire, l’alliinase agit sur l'alliine pour obtenir deux composés dont un acide sulfénique. Cet acide sulfénique se réorganise spontanément en oxyde de propanethial (ou sulfate d’allyle). C’est donc ce composé très volatil qui atteint les yeux. L’eau des larmes l’hydrolyse en acide propanesulfinique qui irrite les yeux[réf. nécessaire]. Finalement, plus l'oignon agit et plus nous réagissons ; mais la réaction entraîne l'agression. Il n'y a alors qu'une solution, éloigner l'oignon de l’œil.

Réaction au contact de sulfate d'allyle :

oignon urticant : stimulus → récepteur sensible au stimulus → centre nerveux qui traite l'information → commande aux glandes lacrymales de pleurer → réflexe : sécrétion et excrétion de larmes.

La douleur qui suit cette réaction est envoyée par les récepteurs seulement un temps après cette réaction, ce qui montre que celle-ci est presque immédiate.

Rôle des émotions dans la surproduction de larmes[modifier | modifier le code]

Homme en pleurs assistant en 1941 à Marseille au départ des drapeaux des Régiments dissous vers l'Afrique du Nord.
Les émotions agissent sur les glandes lacrymales par l'intermédiaire du système limbique. Cela a été rendu possible par une mutation génétique aléatoire qui s'est produite dans l'espèce humaine il y a des centaines de milliers d'années et qui a fait que le système limbique – centre fonctionnel des émotions – s'est connecté aux glandes lacrymales7.

Le nerf facial VII contrôle les glandes lacrymales.

Il existe deux sortes de fibres qui agissent sur les glandes lacrymales : les fibres sympathiques et parasympathiques.

D’une manière générale, au niveau du corps humain, les nerfs parasympathiques et sympathiques contrôlent les activités involontaires des organes (ex. : battements du cœur). L’action des nerfs parasympathiques est très souvent opposée à l’action des nerfs sympathiques. Par exemple, au niveau des glandes, les nerfs parasympathiques augmentent les sécrétions, et les nerfs sympathiques les diminuent. Les commandes du système nerveux peuvent donc trouver, grâce à ces nerfs, un équilibre dans le fonctionnement des organes.

Pour atteindre la glande lacrymale, les fibres parasympathiques et sympathiques empruntent un chemin légèrement différent.

Les fibres sympathiques de la glande lacrymale suivent tout d’abord les fibres sympathiques oculaires puis, au plexus carotidien, prennent une voie différente : elles traversent le nerf pétreux profond.

Les fibres parasympathiques des glandes lacrymales, elles, ont pour origine le centre lacrymo-muco-nasal, situé dans la protubérance annulaire. Elles suivent le nerf VII puis, à la sortie du ganglion géniculé, l’abandonnent et forment le nerf grand pétreux superficiel. Celui-ci s’anastomose avec le nerf pétreux profond et forme le nerf vidien.

Une fois réunies dans le nerf vidien, les fibres sympathiques et parasympathiques de la glande lacrymale atteignent le ganglion sphéno-palation (ou ganglion ptérygo-palatin). Ces fibres sont appelées à leur sortie du ganglion « fibres post-ganglionnaires ». Celles-ci rejoignent le nerf maxillaire supérieur. Elles empruntent la voie orbitaire de ce dernier puis le nerf lacrymal (issu du nerf ophtalmique). Ce nerf va les mener dans la glande lacrymale.

En quoi est-il utile de pleurer après une émotion forte ?[modifier | modifier le code]

Enfant tanzanien en larmes
La composition des larmes évacuées à la suite d’une émotion est très différente des larmes créées en permanence ou des larmes-réflexes. Les pleurs d’émotion contiennent en effet plus de protéines, d’hormones, dont la prolactine mais aussi la leucine encéphalique qui agit sur la douleur. Le message nerveux qui provoque les larmes entraîne également la production d’antalgiques naturels. On retrouve également dans ce type de larmes les molécules responsables du stress ou des toxines apparues sous l’effet du stress.

La particularité des larmes d'émotion reste largement inexplorée. Les effets de catharsis ou relaxant des larmes qu'avancent certaines thèses restent à confirmer, observe la DOG dans une étude publiée en 2009. On peut pleurer sous le coup d'une émotion qu'on ne peut parvenir à verbaliser, lorsque « les mots ne viennent plus »7.

Les pleurs silencieux calment et soulagent davantage que les pleurs bruyants[réf. nécessaire].

Fatigue entraînée par le fait de pleurer[modifier | modifier le code]
Il est courant que le fait de pleurer laisse « une sensation de grande fatigue physique » alors que la personne qui pleure n'a pas l'impression d'avoir fourni un effort8. Ce phénomène vient des situations de stress qui provoquent les larmes et entraînent la libération d'hormones, en particulier du cortisol et de l'adrénaline8. Ces hormones vont elles-mêmes provoquer l'accélération du rythme cardiaque, la dilatation des vaisseaux sanguins et la production d'énergie à partir de glucose et d'acide gras, ce qui va amenuiser les réserves utilisables par les muscles, de la même manière qu'après un effort physique8. En outre, le fait de pleurer fait faire des mouvements qui font aussi travailler des muscles qui sont habituellement peu mobilisés, comme ceux du menton, de la poitrine ou de l'intérieur de la gorge8.

Expressions[modifier | modifier le code]
Pleurer à chaudes larmes : pleurer sincèrement, fortement.
Être au bord des larmes : être poussé à bout, prêt à pleurer.
Larmes de crocodile : larmes hypocrites. Verser des larmes de crocodile : verser de telles larmes. Se dit lorsqu'une personne fait semblant de pleurer (fausses larmes) ou en n'étant pas sincère (en référence aux larmes hypocrites que ces reptiles verseraient sur la mort des proies qu'ils dévorent malgré tout)9. En biologie, larmes de crocodile est synonyme de réflexe gusto-lacrymal et de syndrôme gusto-lacrymal10.
Une larme : une goutte. Se dit par exemple pour demander une petite quantité d'un liquide tel que le champagne.
Les Saintes Larmes font partie des reliques « physiques » du Christ, traces de son passage sur la Terre. Tandis que le Lacryma Christi (larme du Christ) est un vin napolitain.
Pleurer comme une madeleine : pleurer en abondance pendant un large laps de temps.
Fondre en pleurs : Eclater en sanglots.
Verser des pleurs : Pleurer.
Calmer les pleurs : Apaiser les larmes.
Jean qui pleure et Jean qui rit : Passer facilement de la joie à la tristesse. Cette expression vient du poème "Jean qui pleure et qui rit", écrit au XVIIIe siècle par Voltaire. Dans ce poème, Voltaire évoque la versatilité de l'être humain, capable de souffrir de déprime le matin et d'aller festoyer le soir.
Essuyer les pleurs de quelqu'un : Calmer la peine de quelqu'un, consoler.
Pleurer toutes les larmes de son corps : Pleurer beaucoup.
Pleurer de bonheur : Avoir des pleurs de joie, de bien-être.
Pleurer la disparition : Souffrir de la mort de quelqu'un.
Pleurer comme un veau : Pleurer beaucoup à profusion.
Pleurer de rire : Rire énormément.
Faire pleurer le colosse : Désigne le fait d'uriner.
Pleurer après quelqu'un ou quelque chose : Réclamer quelqu'un ou quelque chose avec instance.
Répandre des larmes : Pleurer, pleurnicher, s'épancher, se lamenter.
Larme de vigne[modifier | modifier le code]

Larme de vigne
Au printemps, la vigne taillée laisse s'écouler de la sève au niveau de ses blessures. La vigne est alors en pleurs.

Jacques-Christophe Valmont de Bomare écrit dans son Dictionnaire raisonné d’histoire naturelle11 :

« LARME DE VIGNE, gutta aut lachrima vitis. Nom qu'on donne à la liqueur aqueuse qui distille naturellement goutte à goutte dans le printemps des sommités ou sarmens de la vigne en seve, après qu'elle a été taillée & avant que ses feuilles soient épanouies: on prétend que cette eau est bonne pour les maux des yeux & des reins, & qu'un verre de ces larmes rappelle les sens d'un homme ivre ».

Notes et références[modifier | modifier le code]
↑ Encyclopédie Vulgaris Médicale : Caroncule lacrymale [archive]
↑ Van Haeringen NJ, Clinical biochemistry of tears [archive], Surv Ophthalmol, 1981;26:84
↑ Frey 2nd WH, DeSota-Johnson D, Hoffman C, McCall JT, Effect of stimulus on the chemical composition of human tears [archive], Am J Ophthalmol, 1981;92:559
↑ Laura Schocker, « Savoir pleurer : 13 choses que vous ne savez pas sur les larmes » [archive], sur huffingtonpost.fr, 30 janvier 2014 (consulté le 27 avril 2016).
↑ Anne-Sophie Novel, « Je pleure donc je sale » [archive], sur http://alternatives.blog.lemonde.fr [archive], Le Monde, 18 juin 2012 (consulté le 24 avril 2016).
↑ Gelstein S, Yeshurun Y, Rozenkrantz L et Als. Human tears contain a chemosignal [archive], Science, 2011;331:226-230
↑ a et b Walter C. « Pourquoi pleurons-nous ? » [archive] Cerveau et Psycho 2007, no 20.
↑ a, b, c et d A.D., « Pourquoi est-on fatigué après avoir pleuré ? », Science et Vie,‎ 8 février 2015 (lire en ligne [archive])
↑ François-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, « Larmes de crocodiles » [archive], 1er décembre 2007 (consulté le 10 mai 2009)
↑ « larme » [archive], Centre national de ressources textuelles et lexicales.
↑ Jacques-Christophe Valmont de Bomare, Dictionnaire raisonné d’histoire naturelle, t. 5, Paris, Brunet, 1775, p. 67
Voir aussi[modifier | modifier le code]
Sur les autres projets Wikimedia :

Larme, sur Wikimedia Commons Larme, sur le Wiktionnaire
Bibliographie[modifier | modifier le code]
Ophtalmologie, Éditions scientifique et médicales Elsevier SAS, Paris, 21-003-A-30, 2001, 16 p.
Science et nature, no 93, 1999, p. 21
Larme in Dictionnaire médical, Masson

La Terre est une bulle, la relativité des mots et la prégnance des faits.

RAPPORT DE
Y'BECCA
ET DU
CITOYEN TIGNARD YANIS
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 9195
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr/
Date d'inscription : 09/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: The TranslationalResearch Institute for Space Health (TRISH)   Ven 9 Fév à 10:29

En mathématiques et en sciences physiques, la trajectoire est la ligne décrite par n'importe quel point d'un objet en mouvement, et notamment par son centre de gravité.

En biologie et en écologie la même définition s'applique pour les êtres vivants.

En sciences humaines et sociales, une trajectoire est la succession avec l’âge des passages d’un individu d’un état ou d’une position sociale à l’autre.

Astronomie

En astronomie, la trajectoire, est la courbe que décrit le centre de gravité d'une planète accomplissant sa révolution autour du Soleil, ou d'un satellite naturel autour d'une planète.

La trajectoire apparente est la ligne que décrit un astre sur le fond du ciel lors de sa révolution, telle que la perçoit un observateur terrestre.
Écologie

Dans le domaine de l'écologie, on parle de trajectométrie pour signifier l'étude des déplacements des animaux. Ceux-ci peuvent être suivis directement ou équipés d'émetteurs / récepteur GPS ou d'émetteurs VHF.
Ingénierie

En balistique, la trajectoire est la courbe que décrit le centre de gravité d'un projectile pendant son trajet dans l'espace. Une trajectoire balistique est la phase non propulsée de la trajectoire d'un missile sol-sol.

La discipline ayant pour objet l'étude et la surveillance des trajectoires des missiles et des engins spatiaux est la trajectographie.
Mathématiques

La trajectoire d'un point est, dans un référentiel, l'ensemble des positions successives occupées par ce point au cours du temps.

On introduit en mathématique le formalisme des arcs paramétrés pour décrire d'une part la trajectoire, d'autre part la façon dont elle est parcourue, ou paramétrage.

Des résultats mathématiques établissent des différences fondamentales entre les trajectoires possibles d'une masse ponctuelle sur différentes surfaces :

le long d'une ligne, où par exemple une marche aléatoire repasse presque partout presque surement ;
sur une surface (en deux dimensions), et plus spécifiquement sur un plan, une sphère, un tore ;
dans un volume au carré

Physique des particules

Dans le domaine de la physique des particules, la trajectoire désigne le trajet d'une particule élémentaire, ou d'un élément émis à partir d'une source de rayonnement.
Sciences humaines et sociales

En sciences humaines et sociales, on appelle trajectoire la suite des positions sociales occupées par un individu durant sa vie ou une partie de sa vie. Pour les besoins de l'analyse, les très nombreuses trajectoires différentes des individus d'un groupe sont souvent regroupées en un nombre restreint de trajectoires types. Ces trajectoires sociales différent souvent entre groupes sociaux et leur distribution se modifie au cours du temps. Le plus souvent, les études se concentrent sur un domaine social particulier. Par exemple :

Trajectoires scolaires : âge et niveau scolaire à l’entrée, lors de redoublements, lors d’interruptions, à la sortie, etc.
Trajectoires professionnelles ou trajectoires d’emploi : passage d’un statut à l’autre - apprentissage, stages rémunérés ou non, emploi à durée déterminée, à durée indéterminée, emploi indépendant, temps complet, temps partiel, chômage, cessation d’activité, retraite, interruptions diverses (formation, maladie, prison…), changements de profession, d’employeurs, etc.
Trajectoires résidentielles : succession de logements par type, par composition du ménage, à différents âges, etc.
Trajectoires de revenu salarial : évolution du salaire, interruptions, etc.
Trajectoires médicales et de santé, par exemple en exploitant les fichiers de sécurité sociale.

L'étude des trajectoires sociales nécessite le suivi d'individus au cours du temps et ne peut pas être réalisée au moyen d'une succession de collectes indépendantes de données. Les données peuvent être obtenues :

par enquête transversale, avec des questions sur la vie passée des enquêtés, des employés d'une entreprise, etc.
par une série d'enquêtes longitudinales (les mêmes individus étant enquêtés à plusieurs reprises)
au moyen de fichiers, ou par appariement de plusieurs fichiers (fichiers administratifs, notamment).

[masquer]
v · m
Exemples de courbes

Coniques
Cercle Ellipse Parabole Hyperbole Cardioïde Cissoïde Clothoïde Conchoïde Cycloïde Épicycloïde Folium de Descartes Hélice Hypocycloïde
Astroïde Deltoïde Hypotrochoïde Néphroïde Quadratrice d'Hippias Spirale
Archimède Logarithmique Sinusoïdale Strophoïde Lemniscates
Gerono Booth Bernoulli Courbe du diable Spirique de Persée Trajectoire Ovale de Cassini Chaînette Courbe brachistochrone Isochrone de Leibniz

AINSI,

NASA Breaks a Record With New Horizons Photos—Never Has a Camera Been so Far From Earth
By Sydney Pereira On 2/9/18 at 11:30 AM

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft released photos taken from the greatest distance from Earth ever, the agency announced Thursday. In December, the New Horizons spacecraft took photos using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), breaking a 27-year old record twice within hours.

First, a photo of the “Wishing Well” galactic open star cluster taken 3.79 billion miles from Earth was captured on December 5. LORRI then captured Kuiper Belt objects known as 2012 HZ84 and 2012 HE85—breaking its own record just two hours later. The images of the Kuiper Belt objects are the closest images ever of the belt’s objects and, now, officially the farthest from Earth.

With its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), New Horizons has observed several Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and dwarf planets at unique phase angles, as well as Centaurs at extremely high phase angles to search for forward-scattering rings or dust. These December 2017 false-color images of KBOs 2012 HZ84 (left) and 2012 HE85 are, for now, the farthest from Earth ever captured by a spacecraft. They're also the closest-ever images of Kuiper Belt objects. NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

“New Horizons has long been a mission of firsts—first to explore Pluto, first to explore the Kuiper Belt, fastest spacecraft ever launched,” Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, said in a statement. “And now, we’ve been able to make images farther from Earth than any spacecraft in history.”

The photos taken far into space are a part of the New Horizons spacecraft mission, the fifth spacecraft to go beyond the outer planets. The photos released Thursday break the record of the “Pale Blue Dot” photo.

That photo was taken on February 14, 1990, by NASA’s Voyager 1 at 3.75 billion miles from Earth. The “Pale Blue Dot” image shows Earth as a faraway planet, hence its namesake, revealing how expansive space is compared to our planet. Carl Sagan, famous astronomer whose words on the “Pale Blue Dot” are widely known, requested the photo be taken.

ThePaleBlueDot Earth can be seen as a tiny dot in the middle of the orange stripe on the right side in this "Pale Blue Dot" photograph, taken by NASA's Voyager 1 in 1990, nearly 4 billion miles from Earth. NASA

Sagan wrote about the “Pale Blue Dot” photo, saying that the dot is where “everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lives out their lives.”

He continued: “The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyed of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every 'superstar,' every 'supreme leader,' every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there—on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

Whether these new photos will inspire poetic words like those of Sagan’s about humans’ distant and seemingly arbitrary place in the cosmos is yet to be seen.
Request Reprint or Submit Correction

http://www.newsweek.com/nasa-releases-new-horizons-record-breaking-photos-farthest-away-earth-ever-802003

RAPPORT DU
CITOYEN TIGNARD YANIS
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 9195
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr/
Date d'inscription : 09/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: The TranslationalResearch Institute for Space Health (TRISH)   Ven 9 Fév à 10:31

En mathématiques et en sciences physiques, la trajectoire est la ligne décrite par n'importe quel point d'un objet en mouvement, et notamment par son centre de gravité.

En biologie et en écologie la même définition s'applique pour les êtres vivants.

En sciences humaines et sociales, une trajectoire est la succession avec l’âge des passages d’un individu d’un état ou d’une position sociale à l’autre.

Astronomie

En astronomie, la trajectoire, est la courbe que décrit le centre de gravité d'une planète accomplissant sa révolution autour du Soleil, ou d'un satellite naturel autour d'une planète.

La trajectoire apparente est la ligne que décrit un astre sur le fond du ciel lors de sa révolution, telle que la perçoit un observateur terrestre.
Écologie

Dans le domaine de l'écologie, on parle de trajectométrie pour signifier l'étude des déplacements des animaux. Ceux-ci peuvent être suivis directement ou équipés d'émetteurs / récepteur GPS ou d'émetteurs VHF.
Ingénierie

En balistique, la trajectoire est la courbe que décrit le centre de gravité d'un projectile pendant son trajet dans l'espace. Une trajectoire balistique est la phase non propulsée de la trajectoire d'un missile sol-sol.

La discipline ayant pour objet l'étude et la surveillance des trajectoires des missiles et des engins spatiaux est la trajectographie.
Mathématiques

La trajectoire d'un point est, dans un référentiel, l'ensemble des positions successives occupées par ce point au cours du temps.

On introduit en mathématique le formalisme des arcs paramétrés pour décrire d'une part la trajectoire, d'autre part la façon dont elle est parcourue, ou paramétrage.

Des résultats mathématiques établissent des différences fondamentales entre les trajectoires possibles d'une masse ponctuelle sur différentes surfaces :

le long d'une ligne, où par exemple une marche aléatoire repasse presque partout presque surement ;
sur une surface (en deux dimensions), et plus spécifiquement sur un plan, une sphère, un tore ;
dans un volume au carré

Physique des particules

Dans le domaine de la physique des particules, la trajectoire désigne le trajet d'une particule élémentaire, ou d'un élément émis à partir d'une source de rayonnement.
Sciences humaines et sociales

En sciences humaines et sociales, on appelle trajectoire la suite des positions sociales occupées par un individu durant sa vie ou une partie de sa vie. Pour les besoins de l'analyse, les très nombreuses trajectoires différentes des individus d'un groupe sont souvent regroupées en un nombre restreint de trajectoires types. Ces trajectoires sociales différent souvent entre groupes sociaux et leur distribution se modifie au cours du temps. Le plus souvent, les études se concentrent sur un domaine social particulier. Par exemple :

Trajectoires scolaires : âge et niveau scolaire à l’entrée, lors de redoublements, lors d’interruptions, à la sortie, etc.
Trajectoires professionnelles ou trajectoires d’emploi : passage d’un statut à l’autre - apprentissage, stages rémunérés ou non, emploi à durée déterminée, à durée indéterminée, emploi indépendant, temps complet, temps partiel, chômage, cessation d’activité, retraite, interruptions diverses (formation, maladie, prison…), changements de profession, d’employeurs, etc.
Trajectoires résidentielles : succession de logements par type, par composition du ménage, à différents âges, etc.
Trajectoires de revenu salarial : évolution du salaire, interruptions, etc.
Trajectoires médicales et de santé, par exemple en exploitant les fichiers de sécurité sociale.

L'étude des trajectoires sociales nécessite le suivi d'individus au cours du temps et ne peut pas être réalisée au moyen d'une succession de collectes indépendantes de données. Les données peuvent être obtenues :

par enquête transversale, avec des questions sur la vie passée des enquêtés, des employés d'une entreprise, etc.
par une série d'enquêtes longitudinales (les mêmes individus étant enquêtés à plusieurs reprises)
au moyen de fichiers, ou par appariement de plusieurs fichiers (fichiers administratifs, notamment).

[masquer]
v · m
Exemples de courbes

Coniques
Cercle Ellipse Parabole Hyperbole Cardioïde Cissoïde Clothoïde Conchoïde Cycloïde Épicycloïde Folium de Descartes Hélice Hypocycloïde
Astroïde Deltoïde Hypotrochoïde Néphroïde Quadratrice d'Hippias Spirale
Archimède Logarithmique Sinusoïdale Strophoïde Lemniscates
Gerono Booth Bernoulli Courbe du diable Spirique de Persée Trajectoire Ovale de Cassini Chaînette Courbe brachistochrone Isochrone de Leibniz

AINSI,

Japanese scientists may have discovered a cure for baldness—and it lies within a chemical used to make McDonald’s fries.

A stem cell research team from Yokohama National University used a “simple” method to regrow hair on mice by using dimethylpolysiloxane, the silicone added to McDonald’s fries to stop cooking oil from frothing.

Preliminary tests indicated that the groundbreaking method was likely to be just as successful when transferred to human skin cells.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

A McDonald's employee prepares french fries in Miami. Japanese scientists recently discovered that a chemical used in McDonald's fries could be key in curing baldness. Getty

According to the study, released in the Biomaterials journal last Thursday, the breakthrough came after the scientists successfully mass-produced “hair follicle germs” (HFG) which were created for the first time ever in this way.

HFGs, cells that drive follicle development, are considered the holy grail in hair-loss research. The scientists said use of dimethylpolysiloxane was crucial to the advancement.

“The key for the mass production of HFGs was a choice of substrate materials for the culture vessel,” Professor Junji Fukuda, of Yokohama National University, said in the study. “We used oxygen-permeable dimethylpolysiloxane (PDMS) at the bottom of culture vessel, and it worked very well.”

The technique created 5,000 HFGs simultaneously. The research team then seeded the prepared HFGs from an HFG chip, a fabricated, approximately 300-microwell array, onto the mouse's body.

“These self-sorted hair follicle germs were shown to be capable of efficient hair-follicle and shaft generation upon injection into the backs of nude mice,” Fukuda said.

Within days, Fukuda and his colleagues reported black hairs on the areas of the mouse where the chip had been transplanted. The photos below demonstrate the findings.

A culture vessel for the mass preparation of hair follicle germs (top); generated hairs on the back of a mouse (below). Yokohama National University

"This simple method is very robust and promising,” Fukuda said. “We hope this technique will improve human hair regenerative therapy to treat hair loss such as androgenic alopecia (male pattern baldness). In fact, we have preliminary data that suggests human HFG formation using human keratinocytes and dermal papilla cells."

In 2016, the U.S. hair loss treatment manufacturing industry was worth $6 billion. This included companies that produced restorative hair equipment, such as grafts for hair restoration, as well as oral and topical treatments.

McDonald's did not respond to Newsweek's request for comment at the time of publication.

http://www.newsweek.com/chemical-mcdonalds-fries-may-cure-male-baldness-study-say-799439

RAPPORT DU
CITOYEN TIGNARD YANIS
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: The TranslationalResearch Institute for Space Health (TRISH)   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
The TranslationalResearch Institute for Space Health (TRISH)
Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» EARTHQUAKE WARNING FROM RUSSIAN INSTITUTE of PHYSICS of the EARTH
» Nouveau FAQ de GW sur Space marine
» Space wolves VS tyranides
» Space Marines à vendre (pleins d'affaires)
» Chaos Space Marine Roster - Legion of the Damned

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Le clans des mouettes :: Le clans des mouettes-
Sauter vers: